Install Nextcloud on Fedora 31

Nextcloud is a file sharing software similar to Google drive or Dropbox. The difference is you have full control as Nextcloud is open source and the server can be installed on your own machine. In this article, we’ll be installing Nextcloud on a Fedora 31 Cloud Server.

Prerequisites

A Cloud Server running Fedora 31

 Access to the root or admin user

Install LAMP Stack

First thing to do is install and configure the LAMP (Linux Apache Mariadb PHP)  stack on your server.

Step 1: Install software

dnf install httpd unzip
dnf install php php-gd php-mbstring php-intl php-mysqlnd php-opcache php-json php-zip php-xml
dnf install mariadb mariadb-server

Step 2: MySQL secure installation

It’s a good idea to always run the mysql_secure_installation command right after installing MariaDB or MySQL in order to set a root password, disallow remote root logins, and delete the test databases.

systemctl enable mariadb
systemctl start mariadb
mysql_secure_installation

Step 3: Database configuration

Enter your MariaDB installation.

mysql -p

Create a nextcloud database.

CREATE DATABASE nextcloud;

Create a nextcloud user. Make sure to replace with a secure password of your choosing.

CREATE USER 'nextcloud'@'localhost' IDENTIFIED BY '';

Give nextcloud user access to the nextcloud database.

GRANT ALL PRIVILEGES ON nextcloud.* TO 'nextcloud'@'localhost';

Flush privileges.

FLUSH PRIVILEGES;

Exit MariaDB.

exit

Install Nextcloud

Now that we have our base LAMP stack set up, we can move on to installing Nextcloud itself.

Step 1: Download and prepare Nextcloud

Change to the document root directory.

cd /var/www/html/

Download the latest version of Nextcloud.

wget https://download.nextcloud.com/server/releases/latest.zip

Decompress the file.

unzip latest.zip

Remove the compressed file.

rm latest.zip

Give ownership to the web server.

chown -R apache:apache nextcloud/

Restart Apache.

systemctl enable httpd

systemctl start httpd

Add the http and https services to your firewall.

firewall-cmd --permanent --add-service=http

firewall-cmd --permanent --add-service=https

firewall-cmd --reload

Step 2: Install Nextcloud through web browser

In your web browser on your local machine, navigate to http:///nextcloud

Here, you’ll be able to create your admin user and configure database access. As far as the admin account, choose any secure username/password combination.

Click on the “Storage & database” dropdown. Select “MySQL/MariaDB”.

Enter the same credentials we configured earlier in the Database configuration step. It should be nextcloud as the user and database and the password you set.

Nextcloud will then install the base system as well as a few apps you may find useful. Once this is done, you’ll be greeted with the Nextcloud panel and will be ready to upload some files!

Install Nextcloud on CentOS 8

Nextcloud is a file sharing software similar to Google drive or Dropbox. The difference is you have full control as Nextcloud is open source and the server can be installed on your own machine. In this article, we’ll be installing Nextcloud on a CentOS 8 Cloud Server.

Prerequisites

A Cloud Server running CentOS 8

Access to the root or admin user

Install LAMP Stack

First thing to do is install and configure the LAMP (Linux Apache Mariadb PHP)  stack on your server.

Step 1: Install software

dnf install httpd
dnf install php php-gd php-mbstring php-intl php-mysqlnd php-opcache php-json php-zip php-xml
dnf install mariadb mariadb-server

Step 2: MySQL secure installation

It’s a good idea to always run the mysql_secure_installation command right after installing MariaDB or MySQL in order to set a root password, disallow remote root logins, and delete the test databases.

systemctl enable mariadb
systemctl start mariadb
mysql_secure_installation

Step 3: Database configuration

Enter your MariaDB installation.

mysql -p

Create a nextcloud database.

CREATE DATABASE nextcloud;

Create a nextcloud user. Make sure to replace with a secure password of your choosing.

CREATE USER 'nextcloud'@'localhost' IDENTIFIED BY '';

Give nextcloud user access to the nextcloud database.

GRANT ALL PRIVILEGES ON nextcloud.* TO 'nextcloud'@'localhost';

Flush privileges.

FLUSH PRIVILEGES;

Exit MariaDB.

exit

Install Nextcloud

Now that we have our base LAMP stack set up, we can move on to installing Nextcloud itself.

Step 1: Download and prepare Nextcloud

Change to the document root directory.

cd /var/www/html/

Download the latest version of Nextcloud.

wget https://download.nextcloud.com/server/releases/latest.zip

Decompress the file.

unzip latest.zip

Remove the compressed file.

rm latest.zip

Give ownership to the web server.

chown -R apache:apache nextcloud/

Restart Apache.

systemctl enable httpd

systemctl start httpd

Add the http and https services to your firewall.

firewall-cmd --permanent --add-service=http

firewall-cmd --permanent --add-service=https

firewall-cmd --reload

Step 2: Install Nextcloud through web browser

In your web browser on your local machine, navigate to http:///nextcloud

Here, you’ll be able to create your admin user and configure database access. As far as the admin account, choose any secure username/password combination.

Click on the “Storage & database” dropdown. Select “MySQL/MariaDB”.

Enter the same credentials we configured earlier in the Database configuration step. It should be nextcloud as the user and database and the password you set.

Nextcloud will then install the base system as well as a few apps you may find useful. Once this is done, you’ll be greeted with the Nextcloud panel and will be ready to upload some files!

Installing Froxlor on Fedora 31

Froxlor is an open-source server management software designed to simplify server management through a web interface. This guide will walk you through installing Froxlor on a Fedora 31 server.

Prerequisites:

  • A Cloud Server Running Fedora 31
  • SSH Access as root or an equally privileged user

Install LAMP Stack

Before installing Froxlor, we’ll first install the LAMP (Linux Apache MariaDB PHP) stack with DNF:

dnf install httpd mariadb-server @php php-posix php-bcmath php-zip php-mysqlnd php-pdo

Next, we’ll start and enable Apache and MariaDB:

systemctl start httpd
systemctl enable httpd
systemctl start mariadb
systemctl enable mariad

Access your local MariaDB installation with the MySQL command:

mysql

In the MySQL prompt, run these two commands to set the root password. Make sure to replace with the password you choose.

alter user 'root'@'localhost' identified via mysql_native_password;
alter user 'root'@'localhost' identified by 'VhfbAQHmY3h2yJQ7VrdK';

Exit MariaDB:

exit

Install Froxlor

We’ll download and install Froxlor in the /var/www/html/  directory. Change directory:

cd /var/www/html

Download Froxlor:

wget http://files.froxlor.org/releases/froxlor-latest.tar.gz

Extract files:

sudo tar -xzf froxlor-latest.tar.gz

Delete the tarball:

rm froxlor-latest.tar.gz

Change ownership to apache:

chown -R apache:apache /var/www/html/froxlor

Firewall

Before we can proceed, we need to open up ports 80 and 443 in the firewall.

Open port 80:

firewall-cmd --zone=public --add-service=http --permanent

Open port 443:

firewall-cmd --zone=public --add-service=https --permanent

Reload firewall:

firewall-cmd --reload

Finish Installation In Browser

In your web browser, navigate to http:///froxlor

Click Start install.

All dependencies should be installed and ready to go. Click Click here to continue.

Select your language and input your details. Make sure you give the same MySQL root password you set earlier. Click Click here to continue.

Froxlor will then finish the install. Once done, click Click here to login.

You’ll be greeted with a login screen. Log in and Froxlor is ready to go!

Now that the installation is complete, use our Froxlor initial setup and overview guide to continue.

Froxlor Initial Setup and Overview

In this guide, we’ll go through the initial setup of Froxlor post installation. If you haven’t yet installed Froxlor, use this article to do so before proceeding.

Prerequisites

  • A Cloud Server Running with Froxlor installed
  • SSH Access as root or an equally privileged user

Settings

For now, ignore the System not configured yet. Click here to go to configurations message at the top of the panel as the setting should be configured before services. To get to settings, click on Settings under System in the left panel.

Here you can configure SSL and a host of other settings. I won’t go over them all in this article as there are so many, but it’s a good idea to click on each sub settings menu and look at every option before configuring services.

Services

Once the system settings are ready, click on Configuration under System. Here you can either go through the prompts and manually run every command for every service you need, or you can run the PHP script at the bottom. As the script is a bit faster, I’ll be using that. Copy the script and paste it into your server’s terminal. Make sure to prepend sudo if you are not logged in as root.

Once you run the script, you’ll be asked a series of questions about the server you are running and the services you want to use. The first question will be what operating system you are using. For this guide, I’m using Debian 10 (Buster). Make sure to replace that with the operating system you are using.

You’ll then be asked what web, DNS, SMTP, mail, and FTP servers you want to run. Unless you have a preference, the default values are fine.





Next, you’ll be asked about a few more services. Enter each one you want manually and then enter an empty value once you’ve selected all you need.

A new script will then be generated to install and configure all the services. Enter “y” to run the script immediately.

You’ll be prompted for permission to install software a few times before the script is complete. You’ll see a message “All services have been configured” once complete.

Create a Customer

Now that the services have been configured. We can create our first customer user. Click on Customers under Resources.

Click Create Customer.

Input the account details.

Input contact information.

Input quota and access details.

Installing Froxlor on Debian 10

Froxlor is an open-source server management software designed to simplify server management through a web interface. This guide will walk you through installing Froxlor on a Debian 10 server.

Prerequisites:

  • A Cloud Server Running Debian 10
  • SSH Access as root or an equally privileged user

Enable Official Froxlor repo

Install https support for apt:

sudo apt install apt-transport-https gnupg

Add gpg key:

wget -O - https://deb.froxlor.org/froxlor.gpg | sudo apt-key add -

Enable repo:

sudo echo "deb https://deb.froxlor.org/debian buster main" > /etc/apt/sources.list.d/froxlor.listdeb https://deb.froxlor.org/ubuntu $(lsb_release -sc) main" > /etc/apt/sources.list.d/froxlor.list

Update package list:

sudo apt update

Install Froxlor

With the repo enabled, simply install Froxlor with apt.

apt install froxlor

Configure Database and Web Server

Froxlor expects the document root of your webserver to be in /var/www/. We’ll need to edit Apache’s configuration file to reflect this.

Open Apache configuration file:

nano /etc/apache2/sites-enabled/000-default.conf

Here, you’ll want to find this line:

DocumentRoot /var/www/html

And change it to this:

DocumentRoot /var/www

Once done, restart the Apache service to reload the configuration change.

systemctl restart apache2

Install MySQL-client to access your database from the command line:

apt install mysql-client

Once the client is installed, you can access your local database with the MySQL command:

mysql

In the MySQL prompt, run these two commands to set the root password. Make sure to replace with the password you choose.

alter user 'root'@'localhost' identified via mysql_native_password;
alter user 'root'@'localhost' identified by '';

Exit MySQL:

exit

Finish Installation In Browser

In your web browser, navigate to http:///froxlor

Click Start install.

All dependencies should be installed and ready to go. Click Click here to continue.

Select your language and input your details. Make sure you give the same MySQL root password you set earlier. Click Click here to continue.

Froxlor will then finish the install. Once done, click Click here to login.

You’ll be greeted with a login screen. Log in and Froxlor is ready to go!

Now that the installation is complete, use our Froxlor initial setup and overview guide to continue.

Installing Froxlor on CentOS 8

Froxlor is an open-source server management software designed to simplify server management through a web interface. This guide will walk you through installing Froxlor on a CentOS 8 server.

Prerequisites:

  • A Cloud Server Running CentOS 8
  • SSH Access as root or an equally privileged user

Install LAMP Stack

Before installing Froxlor, we’ll first install the LAMP (Linux Apache MariaDB PHP) stack with DNF:

dnf install httpd mariadb-server @php php-posix php-bcmath php-zip php-mysqlnd php-pdo

Next, we’ll start and enable Apache and MariaDB:

systemctl start httpd
systemctl enable httpd
systemctl start mariadb
systemctl enable mariad

Access your local MariaDB installation with the MySQL command:

mysql

In the MySQL prompt, run these two commands to set the root password. Make sure to replace with the password you choose.

alter user 'root'@'localhost' identified via mysql_native_password;
alter user 'root'@'localhost' identified by 'VhfbAQHmY3h2yJQ7VrdK';

Exit MariaDB:

exit

Install Froxlor

We’ll download and install Froxlor in the /var/www/html/  directory. Change directory:

cd /var/www/html

Download Froxlor:

wget http://files.froxlor.org/releases/froxlor-latest.tar.gz

Extract files:

sudo tar -xzf froxlor-latest.tar.gz

Delete the tarball:

rm froxlor-latest.tar.gz

Change ownership to apache:

chown -R apache:apache /var/www/html/froxlor

Firewall

Before we can proceed, we need to open up ports 80 and 443 in the firewall.

Open port 80:

firewall-cmd --zone=public --add-service=http --permanent

Open port 443:

firewall-cmd --zone=public --add-service=https --permanent

Reload firewall:

firewall-cmd --reload

Finish Installation In Browser

In your web browser, navigate to http:///froxlor

Click Start install.

All dependencies should be installed and ready to go. Click Click here to continue.

Select your language and input your details. Make sure you give the same MySQL root password you set earlier. Click Click here to continue.

Froxlor will then finish the install. Once done, click Click here to login.

You’ll be greeted with a login screen. Log in and Froxlor is ready to go!

Now that the installation is complete, use our Froxlor initial setup and overview guide to continue.

Installing Froxlor on Ubuntu 18.04

Froxlor is an open-source server management software designed to simplify server management through a web interface. This guide will walk you through installing Froxlor on an Ubuntu 18.04 server.

Prerequisites:

  • A Cloud Server Running Ubuntu 18.04
  • SSH Access as root or an equally privileged user

Enable Official Froxlor repo

Install https support for apt:

sudo apt install apt-transport-https

Add gpg key:

wget -O - https://deb.froxlor.org/froxlor.gpg | sudo apt-key add -

Enable repo:

sudo echo "deb https://deb.froxlor.org/ubuntu $(lsb_release -sc) main" > /etc/apt/sources.list.d/froxlor.list

Update package list:

sudo apt update

Install Froxlor

With the repo enabled, simply install Froxlor with apt.

apt install froxlor

Configure Database and Web Server

Froxlor expects the document root of your webserver to be in /var/www/. We’ll need to edit Apache’s configuration file to reflect this.

Open Apache configuration file:

nano /etc/apache2/sites-enabled/000-default.conf

Here, you’ll want to find this line:

DocumentRoot /var/www/html

And change it to this:

DocumentRoot /var/www

Once done, restart the Apache service to reload the configuration change.

systemctl restart apache2

Install MySQL-client to access your database from the command line:

apt install mysql-client

Once the client is installed, you can access your local database with the MySQL command:

mysql

In the MySQL prompt, run these two commands to set the root password. Make sure to replace with the password you choose.

alter user 'root'@'localhost' identified with mysql_native_password;
alter user 'root'@'localhost' identified by '';

Exit MySQL:

exit

Finish Installation In Browser

In your web browser, navigate to http:///froxlor

Click Start install.

All dependencies should be installed and ready to go. Click Click here to continue.

Select your language and input your details. Make sure you give the same MySQL root password you set earlier. Click Click here to continue.

Froxlor will then finish the install. Once done, click Click here to login.

You’ll be greeted with a login screen. Log in and Froxlor is ready to go!

Now that the installation is complete, use our Froxlor initial setup and overview guide to continue.

Installing Apache on Fedora 31

The Apache HTTP Server, colloquially called Apache, is a free and open-source cross-platform web server software. Apache is an extremely popular web service that operates a large portion of the websites on the internet. This article will walk you through the simple process of installing Apache, and opening your server’s firewall up to allow web traffic through.

Prerequisites:

• Linux based server running Fedora 31

Step-by-Step:

The following command will begin the installation of Apache. You may be prompted to enter ‘Y’ proceed through the installation:

# sudo dnf install httpd

We’ll now need Apache, running in order to display our site and accept connections. Use the following commands to start Apache, set it to start automatically upon boot, and open the server’s firewall to web traffic:

# sudo systemctl start httpd
# sudo systemctl enable httpd
# sudo firewall-cmd --add-service=http --permanent
# sudo firewall-cmd --reload

You should now be able to navigate to the IP address of your server in a browser, and see the Apache test page to confirm you’ve configured the server correctly. This page also will display useful information for further configuring Apache to serve your own custom website or application.

Installing Apache on Debian 10

The Apache HTTP Server, colloquially called Apache, is a free and open-source cross-platform web server software. Apache is an extremely popular web service that operates a large portion of the websites on the internet. This article will walk you through the simple process of installing Apache, and opening your server’s firewall up to allow web traffic through.

Prerequisites:

• Linux based server running Debian 10

Step-by-Step:

Before installing Apache we’ll want to make sure your our package management repositories are fully up to date. Run this command to get the latest package listings and update installed packages to their latest versions:

# sudo apt update

After updating, we’ll install Apache, set it to start on boot, and start the service. After which we’ll add a firewall rule to allow port 80 through and make that change persistent:

# sudo apt install apache2
# sudo systemctl start apache2.service
# sudo systemctl enable apache2.service
# sudo iptables -I INPUT -p tcp --dport 80 -j ACCEPT
# sudo iptables-save

You should now be able to navigate to the IP address of your server in a browser, and see the Apache test page to confirm you’ve configured the server correctly. This page also will display useful information for further configuring Apache to serve your own custom website or application.

Installing Apache on Ubuntu 18.04

The Apache HTTP Server, colloquially called Apache, is a free and open-source cross-platform web server software. Apache is an extremely popular web service that operates a large portion of the websites on the internet. This article will walk you through the simple process of installing Apache, and opening your server’s firewall up to allow web traffic through.

Prerequisites:

• Linux based server running Ubuntu 18.04

Step-by-Step:

Before installing Apache, we’ll want to make sure our package management repositories are fully up to date. Run this command to get the latest package listings and update installed packages to their latest versions:

# sudo apt update

After updating, we’ll install Apache, set it to start on boot, and start the service:

# sudo apt install apache2
# sudo systemctl start apache2.service
# sudo systemctl enable apache2.service

You should now be able to navigate to the IP address of your server in a browser, and see the Apache test page to confirm you’ve configured the server correctly. This page also will display useful information for further configuring Apache to serve your own custom website or application.